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The best costumes in film of all time part three

Continuing on from part one and part two:

Eleven: Marie Antoinette

I’ve spoken about Marie Antoinette before, it is an absolutely stunning film by one of my favourite directors Sofia Coppola and whenever I think about the best costumes in film this immediately pops into my head. The queen of France, Marie Antoinette is young, fresh and a lover of fashion (especially shoes) and enjoys indulging in cake and champagne. Costume designer Milena Canonero won Best Costume Design for the film at the Oscars in 2006 due to the pastel coloured dresses including duck egg, mint green, baby pink and peach which are all currently fashion trends this spring 2012. The lace collars, the wide exaggerated under skirts and corsets are a depiction of what the queen did wear during the late 1700s but with a romantic, edgier feel which has a traditional notion with a little modern-day cult thrown in.

Twelve: Inception

The wonderfully creative, mind-boggling Inception messed with our heads in the summer of 2010 and although the costumes are impressive for all of the characters (I can’t pin point just ONE great costume moment!), the costumes play a particularly important role in the way that the film is being told. Costume designer Jeffrey Kurland had to work extra close with director Christopher Nolan to make sure the clothes are accurate throughout the dreams and also the reality but while speaking to Clothes on Film he might have given away the ending. All of the clothes were custom-made and each character had their own individual style and colour palette as shown in the above image therefore everything was made specifically for each of them. Due to the architecture professions in the film Jeffrey chose sharp lines such as peaked lapels, windowpane patterns, and plaids.

Thirteen: Sex and the City

For the first Sex and the City film Carrie had more than 80 outfits to wear but this is by far the most memorable. The moment when Carrie receives a large dress box and a note from the woman herself, Vivienne Westwood stating that the dress belonged to Carrie, after seeing her wearing it during a Vogue photo shoot. It would only happen to her wouldn’t it? The dress is a little OTT, I remember seeing it and thinking it was lovely but Carrie is the only one that could pull it off even though I wasn’t a fan of her ‘something blue’ feather a.k.a. bird head-piece, yet it did give the outfit edge which you would expect from her. The beautiful fabric is luminous – the champagne silk is the perfect colour for Carrie whilst the fabric itself is very classic. The dress has a silk bustier with a built-in corset, a puff under-skirt which is also silk but a slightly off-white colour with an asymmetric hem. Sarah Jessica Parker and the Sex and the City films are sure great for marketing, particularly as shopping platform Net A Porter sold out of the Vivienne Westwood Carrie dress’ on their website for $10,000 a pop despite it only being a knee-length version (the floor length version is $15,7000 which you have to order from the lady herself, Vivienne and wait six months for it to be produced.) Were you inspired by this dress for your wedding?

Fourteen: Alice in Wonderland

I love anything Tim Burton and there’s no deny in the fact that his films excel in everything – production design, script, visual effects and of course, costume design. With his eccentric mind alongside his long-standing costume designer Colleen Atwood who has worked on many of Burton’s films (Edward Scissorhands, Planet of the Apes, Sweeney Todd, Sleepy Hollow and upcoming film Dark Shadows) the costumes ooze originality. Alice in Wonderland is no exception. There are wonderful costumes throughout, but of course Johnny Depp’s Mad Hatter stands out to most. Colleen explored the world of hat makers in London from the Edwardian era which inspired her more than the previous illustrations of the Mad Hatter from Lewis Carroll’s book. Depp being a chameleon by adapting to all of his costumes so well that they don’t even appear as costume was dressed in very playful and eccentric clothes to portray his mad personality, yet not distracting away from his character and personal story within the film. The jacket is made from silk which is burnt by the break-down department to give it age, he also has a bow tie which reacts with his mood which rises up when he is happy and droops down when he is sad. He has a pair of scissors attached to the a jacket with scrap pieces of ribbon which he can use to create a hat at the last-minute, there is embroidery on his trousers which is an embroidered ‘doodle’ which he does while waiting for Alice to come to tea and he also has mismatch socks as he lost the pairs.

Fifteen: The Help


Being a huge fan of 1960s clothing, or ‘Mad Men era’ shall I say, I absolutely adored The Help. Costume designer Sharen Davis transformed the best-selling novel by Kathryn Stockett into costume heaven with sort-after dresses upon dresses of the ice-cream shade kind. The bold floral prints and pastel shades are so visually appealing and beautifully hand-made that it’s very clear how much effort she put into transforming sheets of fabric into wonderful shift dresses, pencil skirts and ultra-feminine blouses. Kathryn created 50 costumes from scratch using vintage fabrics with the rest being sourced from vintage and costume shops, the latter being difficult due to the rural location which meant cast members having to fly to LA for their fittings. Taking inspiration from old Vogue magazines, 1960s high-street fashion catalogues and Marilyn Monroe, the overall look is any fashion-lover’s dream and an expensive one at that – she spent $15,000 on just the period accessories which included leather structured handbags, pearl choker necklaces and cat-eye sunglasses.

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Oscar 2012 – The Artist and Hugo big winners.

So, it’s early evening here in the UK and I haven’t been able to stop yawning or rubbing my eyes all day. This is the after-effects of watching the Oscars or  an ‘Oscar come-down’ if you will. Due to the time difference I tuned in to watch all the glitz and the glamour at 1.30am and went to bed at 5.00am – it was definitely a fall-asleep-as-soon-as-your-head-touches-the-pillow moment once it had finished. Before you start to get annoyed with my feel-sorry-for-me routine I will swiftly move on and inform you of all the winners (and losers) of this year’s Academy Awards.

The winners are in bold.

Best Picture

The Artist

War Horse

The Tree of Life

Moneyball

The Descendants

Midnight in Paris

The Help

Hugo

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

Best Director

Michel Hazanavicius – The Artist

Alexander Payne – The Descendants

Martin Scorsese – Hugo

Woody Allen – Midnight in Paris

Terrence Malick – The Tree of Life

Best Actor

Jean Dujardin – The Artist

Demian Bichir – A Better Life

Brad Pitt – Moneyball

George Clooney – The Descendants

Gary Oldman – Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

Best Actress

Meryl Streep – The Iron Lady

Glenn Close – Albert Nobbs

Viola Davis – The Help

Rooney Mara – The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Michelle Williams – My Week With Marilyn

Best Supporting Actor

Christopher Plummer – Beginners

Kenneth Branagh – My Week With Marilyn

Jonah Hill – Moneyball

Nick Nolte – Warrior

Max von Sydow – Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close

Best Supporting Actress

Octavia Spencer – The Help

Berenice Bejo – The Artist

Jessica Chastain – The Help

Melissa McCarthy – Bridesmaids

Janet McTeer – Albert Nobbs

Best Foreign Language Film

A Separation – Iran

Bullhead – Belgium

Footnote – Israel

In Darkness – Poland

Monsieur Lazhar – Canada

Best Animation

Rango

A Cat in Paris

Chico and Rita

Kung Fu Panda 2

Puss in Boots

Best Original Screenplay

Midnight in Paris – Woody Allen

The Artist – Michel Hazanavicius

Bridesmaids – Annie Mumolo and Kristen Wiig

Margin Call – JC Chandor

A Separation – Asghar Farhadi

Best Adapted Screenplay

The Descendants – Alexander Payne, Nat Faxon and Jim Rash

Hugo – John Logan

The Ides of March – George Clooney, Grant Heslov and Beau Willimon

Moneyball – Steven Zaillian and Aaron Sorkin. Story by Stan Chervin.

Tinker Tailor Solider Spy – Bridget O’Connor and Peter Straughan

Best Art Direction

Hugo – Dante Ferretti and Francesca Lo Schiavo

The Artist

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows part 2

Midnight in Paris

War Horse

Best Cinematography

Hugo – Robert Richardson

The Artist

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Hugo

The Tree of Life

War Horse

Best Sound Mixing

Hugo – Tom Fleischman and John Midgley

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Moneyball

Transformers: Dark of the Moon

War Horse

Best Sound Editing

Hugo – Philip Stockton and Eugene Gearty

Drive

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Transformers: Dark of the Moon

War Horse

Best Original Song

Man or Muppet, from The Muppets – music and lyrics by Bret McKenzie

Real in Rio from Rio – music by Sergio Mendes and Carlinhos Brown and lyrics by Siedah Garrett

Best Original Score

The Artist – Ludovic Bource

The Adventures of Tintin

Hugo

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

War Horse

Real in Rio from Rio – music by Sergio Mendes and Carlinhos Brown and lyrics by Siedah Garrett

Best Costume Design

The Artist – Mark Bridges

Anonymous

Hugo

Jane Eyre

W.E.

Best Documentary Feature

Undefeated

Hell and Back Again

If a Tree Falls: A Story of the Earth Liberation Front

Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory

Pina

Best Documentary Short

Saving Face

The Barber of Birmingham: Foot Soldier of the Civil Rights Movement

God is the Bigger Elvis

Incident in New Baghdad

The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom

Best Film Editing

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo – Kirk Baxter and Angus Wall

The Artist

The Descendants

Hugo

Moneyball

Best Animated Short Film

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr Morris Lessmore

Dimanche/Sunday

La Luna

A Morning Stroll

Wild Life

Best Live Action Short Film

The Shore

Pentecost

Raju

Time Freak

Tuba Atlantic

Best Visual Effects

Hugo – Rob Legato, Joss Williams, Ben Grossman and Alex Henning

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2

Real Steel

Rise of the Planet of the Apes

Transformers: Dark of the Moon

Best Make Up

The Iron Lady – Mark Coulier and J Roy Helland

Albert Nobbs

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2

So that’s that. Hollywood’s biggest night of the year is over until 2013, were you happy with the winners? Hugo and The Artist were the winners of the night it seems. The Iron Lady receiving best make-up? Not sure I agree with that – Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows part 2 is definitely a more deserving winner. I completely agreed with The Artist winning best costume design and I loved seeing how happy Jean Dujardin was when he received best actor and even happier when Bret McKenzie won best original song for The Muppets. 

Let me know your thoughts!

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